Lessons learned

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One of the things that is done in companies is to evaluate projects to discover the “lessons learned”. I have learned that it is not possible for me to keep up two blogs and I had to let my english blog lay dormant for a (long) whilee. I do apologize to my english speaking friends and colleagues and I hope to make it up to you by writing an occasional post in English, albeit not as often as the original blog.
It has been 4 years now since my stroke. There are definately some lessons to be learned here.
– Keep up with the medical information you need to know to recognize serious illnesses. I use the site of dr. Weil and dr. Christiane Northrup as important sources of information, together with a big book of medical information for the family to determine whether you have something serious and what you can do about it. A book is always available, not dependent on internet, and has checklists and pictures to show you what to do. Other programs may be of interest  as well. In this program is the role and risk of pre-eclampsia discussed; if the doctors’ post had taken that into account they would have searched for stroke clues sooner. A book is always available, not dependent on internet, and has checklists and pictures to show you what to do.
– Make sure you have a copy of your medication and medical history updated and with you. It is difficult to remember when you arrive at the hospital what you had and when and what they gave you for it.
– Make sure there is someone with you who can drive you to the doctor or to the hospital. This someone is also the one to record the actions being taken, and meds being given. It is not natural in every hospital to give the patient a clear insight in what is recommended and given to you.
– Make sure you get a paper copy of everything they write about you.
– Check your patient file or have it checked and ask a copy
– Inform your GP yourself or have someone inform them. Information does not always reach your GP.
– Give your pharmacist permission to share data with the hospital about medication.
– Have someone check whether all information is correct and whether it has reached the correct persons. This is NOT a given, many mistakes are still made everyday.
– Have someone check alternative treatments of what you have. Sometimes you are not told all the options.
– Once you are out of the first critical phase, sit down with your GP and evaluate what went well and what could be improved. Also agree on a course of action for the future. I see my doctor every 3-4 months for a bloodpressure check and I gather all non urgent questions for that appointment.
– Do not wait to go to your GP when you feel something is wrong. It is better to be treated by your GP then by an emergency room doctor who does not know you.
– Accept that mistakes can happen and move on with your life. Mistakes were made in my case, but there is no use spoiling my life and that of my family by moaning around. Nobody gets better from that. Be kind to doctors who acknowledge a mistake has been made. Be tenacious to doctors who do not acknowledge there has been made a mistake and make sure it is not sent to “the large organization”
– Do all that you can to make sure mistakes are prevented and lessons learned. Share your story. Write a blog. Go to the media if you have the energy for it. Advise others on how to treat a patient.

And don’t forget to enjoy the fact that you are alive. Life can be over before you know it , so it is best to enjoy every minute!

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The Diagnosis

diagnosisThe Diagnosis

At the end of the day, a very tall doctor entered the ward and stopped at the end of my bed. A shorter, female doctor, who is a neurologist in training, joined us as well.
“Ma’am, we finally found the cause that explains all of your symptoms,” he said. “You have a blood clot in your brainstem, and that is why we couldn’t find anything on the first scans. You will start receiving medication which will reduce the possibility of a new stroke.”
I did not know how to respond, and it was hard to understand what he was talking about. Talking and listening seemed very tiring these days. Where he was standing felt like a great distance was between us, and I thought his words would become clearer if he would come and sit closer to my head.
“We’ll run some more tests to see where the blood clot came from,” he continued. “We’ll also get some more blood tests and make an heart echo. A physiotherapist will come by to exercise with you, and my cohort here will stop by regularly to check on you” — he nodded toward the female doctor.
I really don’t care anymore. It was a strange world these days, and I could only focus on one thing at a time. Right now that focus was directed toward being extremely tired.